NON-FOOD PARTNERSHIP OPTIONS

Lagos Food Bank believes that through targeted collaboration, we can do
more to achieve a hunger-free Lagos by 2030.
Beyond meeting the immediate needs of our targeted beneficiaries, we
welcome other forms of partnerships with individuals and corporate bodies
to achieve the following:
1)Provide Boreholes/well with pump with filters or water treatment in one or
more undeserved communities.

2) Supply Solar powered kits like rechargeable lamps and bulbs.

3) Refurbish: Public Schools toilets, libraries or provide educational
materials like school bags, books and footwear to indigent school children

4) Pay School fees or scholarship for indigent children in the slum
communities

5) Sponsor or put an indigent family on food scholarship for 6months for
steady food collection from the food banks.

6) Provide medical supplies such as eye glasses, mobility aids like wheel
chairs clutches to people living with disabilities, breast pads for nursing
mothers

7) Provision of learning materials for children with special needs.

8) Pay hospital bills for the poor in different general hospitals.

9) Provide Sanitary pads for girls/ Promotion of sexual health and
Prevention of STDs awareness campaign and supply of condoms.

10) Provide nutritional supplements to Pregnant Women to sustain them
through the pregnancy circle.

11) Set up small scale businesses for widows and extremely indigent
women
In Lagos slums and support for skill acquisition.

12) Provide Mosquito Nets to vulnerable Families living in the slum.

13) Clean up slums and provide waste bins for sustainable and healthy
environment

14) Provide Cooking Stoves to households in the slums

15) Provide post-delivery kits to nursing mothers.

16) Provide lunch through food vouchers to selected poor children in
different public schools for 3-6 months. Food vendors in schools are paid in
advance.

17) Register teenage girls for skill acquisition training and empowerment.

18) Provide clothing to families living in the slum. Second hand clothing are
purchased at a very reduced rate from a local market and distributed to
children and their parents in the slum.